Start Strong and Follow Your Intuition

Enthusiasm is usually pretty high when beginning new work.  That was the case with this painting.  Let’s see what happened along the way and what seems to have eventuated.

It started with some fun wedge marks using “in your face” Indian yellow. Cheerful, but a bit much all over things eh!

Sticking with “in your face” colour I applied red gold and white, along with some graphite lines. Scratching about to create some texture seemed like a good idea too.

I couldn’t get away from the strong colour so I thought, ok, stick with it. On went some pthalo turquoise and white in a frenzy of mark making. Oh well! That was fun, but mmm? What now?

No! I thought. That’s enough killer colour! So, now, how to deal with it? Easy option …. wedge on some white, not to thickly cover it, but to take the edge off. After that it cried out for some glazing. So, I obliged using a little red gold, not much, and some Indian yellow.

When I say not much red gold I mean only a little glazing-wise, but those stronger lines were added as well. It was a risk I took and I think it paid off. The lines provide a nice structure.

It might be finished (above) but I’m going to wait a short time to see if my completion comfort level changes. It’s a fairly busy painting which feels a little unsettling.

(Detail)

If the painting sits well after a break it’ll be declared done and take its place on Bluethumb. There’s a slight question in my mind about whether to highlight or push back some parts, or perhaps a bit of both.

(Detail)

The beauty of waiting a while is that, usually, as soon as you look at it again, you know exactly how you feel. The break provides a bit of emotional distance and allows you to view things objectively as well as letting your intuition have a say if it feels inclined.

Ok, what’s next?

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Devotion Pays Off

I’m talking fine art here, but these thoughts could apply to numerous creative pursuits.

Have you ever looked back over your creative time and noticed unintended links and developments in your work?

Often it’s not until some time later that you realise previous work has led to or influenced new work. Follow the progression through these pieces that I worked on over a period of eight years from 2014 to 2022.

It makes me think about the times when you think there’s nothing exciting to do. All the old things seem boring, like they’ve run their course and there’s nothing new presenting itself that’s worth attacking with gusto.

It’s times like those when devotion to making art comes into play, consciously or not. Not just for the fun, exciting times, but the whole box and dice of good and bad times. Those weeks, months or years of work sit quietly in place influencing you. That place can be a box, a sketchbook, your photos, in a frame on the wall, or your subconscious, your journal, your memory, anywhere!

When I say devotion, I realise you cannot know whether your subconscious is playing the game. But, it seems to me that if I’m consciously focussed on art, my subconscious is too. I know this because art ideas will spring to mind and I can tell they’ve come from past work. And, it won’t be ideas for sewing, which I’ve done in the past, or what to eat for dinner that night.

Of course, being “in” and doing your work helps your conscious brain think about what’s next too. It’s like two brains!

When you realise you’ve been working on a piece and have been influenced by past work it feels somehow comforting. It’s knowing there’s a thread running through things that is yours and yours alone. You’re creating authentic, original pieces that nobody else ever could. Sure they can copy afterwards, but it was yours first.

I can hear you asking, “But what about artists you’ve been influenced by?” Fair question. I don’t copy other artists, but I’m obviously going to be influenced by them. But, it’ll be in a way that is individual to me, combined with all my other influencing factors.

The good thing about all this is that things beget things! “Working” creates momentum, internally and externally. You just have to keep going for it to happen!

Exhibitions

For the Hobartians among you. The Art Society of Tasmania’s Annual Exhibition is opening on Friday night. Click here and scroll down to find out about it.

Juggler” 67cm x 97cm is one of my entries. It’s actually another painting in the development series I’m talking about here.

New art on Bluethumb

Summer Rain” 20cm square
“Leftovers” 30cm square

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Click here to find out about exhibitions I currently have work in.

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Sending Your Work Out Into The World

Things get busy when there are exhibitions lurking about!  It’s been a busy time preparing work for several exhibitions, as well as getting the four small paintings below ready to go to Miss Bond, a lovely shop in the Salamanca Arts Centre here in Hobart.

“Tryst”, “Around and About”, “Rendezvoux” and “Orbit” all 20cm x 20cm square

I really enjoy painting these little paintings.  They’re so crisp and playful.

On another playful note, here are three of them on display at Miss Bond accompanied by shadows and reflections.

These two paintings (below) have been dropped off for the bi-annual Clarence Open Art Exhibition which is on from 2 to 24 July 2022. It’s held at Rosny Farm Art Centre and Rosny Barn in Rosny Park.

“Veil” 60cm wide x 70cm high

Just before publishing this “Studio News” I visited the Exhibition. While I was standing near “Veil” a collector arrived with one of the exhibition organisers to place a red “sold” dot under it! I wonder, what are the chances of a sale happening with the artist there on a casual visit and standing not far away from the painting?!

Back to business ….. To facilitate the hanging of “Party at the Gorge I needed a large cradled panel.  I’m pleased to say that I was able to pull off that minor feat of carpentry with help from a friend and my husband.

“Party at The Gorge” 67cm wide x 70cm high

At one of the art get togethers that I attend, we recently had a covid variety Cancer Council fund-raiser. Usually, it’s a morning tea for all the various groups that frequent the Centre but, as we all know, covid changes things.

This year it was decided to have everyone work, in their groups, on specially chosen master works by artists like Picasso, Vermeer etc. We were all given an outline copy of the artwork to work on in whatever way we chose. You can see some of the results below. Our room sure looked brighter when they were all put up. For the privilege of this experience, we each made a donation, and supplied ourselves with morning tea.

It was a great idea, something different, and very interesting to see the variety of approaches that were taken. Mine is a mixture of collage and paint (below). It’s after one of Picasso’s Weeping Woman paintings. Others used materials from their area of expertise, such as fabric and wool. One was entirely collage, another completely monochrome, everyone’s choices varied greatly. It really got some creative juices flowing. Lots of fun! Some “Weeping Women” looked positively distraught, others less so.

I’ve had a forced break from art for a couple of weeks but I’m back in the saddle now.

There are more paintings to prepare for coming exhibitions, cradled panels to be constructed and new works to begin. An artist’s work is never done. That is, if you can call it work!

New art on Bluethumb.

Only one listing since the last Studio News but I have more to finalise. Another job for the list!

“Within the Boundary” 40cm x 40cm square

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Click here to find out about exhibitions I currently have work in.

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Bringing Things Back Into Line

Or, it can be more like bringing yourself back into line! Painting can definitely be a combination of both.

This one started freely with hope, a sense of excitement, free gestural wedge marks and fun graphite lines.

Collage felt like just the thing so I decided to play about on top of the paint and graphite.

Now what? Some digital fiddling perhaps? It can be fun, if not time consuming, looking for designs using a photo editing app …. could really lead you astray!

After digital play time, I decided to use one of the weird imaginary landscape designs I had “found”. Who knows how the mind of an artist works!?

Ok, so that just didn’t do it for me.

How to remedy the situation and bring it back into line so to speak? There were several choices, as there always are.

  • Bring it back into line by covering the whole lot and starting afresh, ie kill it
  • Use more collage on top
  • Do some more wedgy play on top, or
  • Get busy and sand it back a bit, or a lot.

Sanding sounded adventurous so I went with that option. After sanding for a while it started to look and feel better. Perhaps we are onto something here! It took longer than you’d think to hand sand it back to something that seemed acceptable. The painting is on paper, but the paper seems able to take a beating. Anyway, this was the result.

The artist is happy now it seems …. might put it in a local art society exhibition if I can get it mounted on a cradled wooden panel in time.

All went well, but after carefully glueing it to a panel and weighing it down overnight I discovered bubbles under the paper. NOT happy! The damn thing is fighting back! If the bubbles can’t be fixed it’s the end of going in the exhibition and (the painting doesn’t realise this) but it’s the end of it too. (It would have to be removed from the panel which isn’t pretty.)

After another unscheduled “bringing it back into line” assignment (which is a rather voodoo doll like exercise) and resealing it, we have the painting below – “Feeling Frosty”, a slightly smaller, cropped version, all stuck down neatly on a white cradled panel and ready to hang in the exhibition.

All this toing and froing is inevitable, but it’s part of the joy of making art. I guess it’s similar to being out of control! There are, however, varying degrees of control and frustrations in art, or lack of them, as the case may be. Artists’ moods, temperaments and how they “cope” with these experiences also vary. Do you give up, or, continue, have fun and hope for the best? What might be sheer joy to one of us delicate creatures will send the next one mad! Indeed, I myself have moved from the mad camp to the joy camp. Well, I like to think that’s where I am most of the time.

Happy creating!

These new paintings of mine are now listed for sale on Bluethumb.

“Switchback” 22cm wide x 22cm high
“Party at the Gorge” 67cm wide x 70cm high

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Click here to find out about exhibitions I currently have work in.

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